Running my own calendar server

Note: This is an article I started in October of 2012 and never finished. Fortunately, my feelings on the issue haven't changed significantly. So I filled it out into a real entry. Enjoy!

As I alluded to in a (not so) recent entry on switching RSS readers, I'm anti-cloud.

Of course, that's a little ambiguous. The fact is, "cloud" doesn't really mean anything anymore. It's pretty much come to refer to "doing stuff on somebody else's server." So these days we refer to "having your e-mail in the cloud" rather than "using a third-party webmail service," like we did 15 years ago. But really it's exactly the same thing - despite all the bells and whistles, GMail is not fundamentally different than the Lycos webmail account I used in 1999. It still amounts to relying entirely on some third-party's services for your e-mail needs.

And if the truth were known, I'm not even really against "the cloud" per se. I have no real objection to, say, hosting a site on an Amazon EC2 or Windows Azure instance that I'm paying for. It's really just the "public cloud." You know, all those "cloud services" that companies offer for free - things like GMail and Google Calendar spring to mind.

And it's not even that I object to using these servies. It's just that I don't want to rely on them for anything I deem at all important. This is mostly because of the often-overlooked fact that users have no control over these services. The providers can literally cut you off at a moment's notice and there's not a thing you can do about it. With a paid service, you at least have some leverage - maybe not much, but they generally at least owe you some warning.

There are, of course, innumerable examples of this. The most recent one for me is Amazon Music. They used to[i] offer a hosting service where you could upload your personal MP3 files to the Amazon cloud and listen to them through their service. I kinda liked Amazon Music, so I was considering doing that. Then they terminated that service. So now I use Plex and/or Subsonic to listen to my music straight from my [i]own server, than you very much!

As a result, I have my own implementation of a lot of stuff. This includes running my own calendar server. This is a project that has had a few incarnations, but that I've always felt was important for me. Your calendar is a window into your every-day life, a record of every important event you have. Do you really want to trust it to some third party? Especially one that basically makes its money by creating a detailed profile of everything you do so that they can better serve ads to you? (I think we all know who I'm thinking of here....)

For several years I used a simple roll-your-own CalDAV server using SabreDAV. That worked fine, but it was quite simple and I needed a second application to provide a web-based calendar (basically a web-based CalDAV client). So I decided to switch to something a little more full-featured and easier to manage.

So these days, I just run my own OwnCloud instance. At it's core, OwnCloud is basically a WebDAV server with a nice UI on top of it. In addition to nice file sync-and-share support, it gives me web-based calendar and contact apps with support for CalDAV and CardDAV respectively. It also has the ability to install additional apps to provide more features, such as an image gallery, music players, and note-taking apps. Most of the more impressive apps are for the enterprise version only, or require third-party services or additional servers, but all I really wanted was calendar and contact support.

To get the full experience, I also use the OwnCloud apps on my laptop and phone to sync important personal files, as well as the DAVx5 app on my phone to synchronize the Android calendar and contacts database with my server. Overall, it works pretty well and doesn't really require much maintenance. And most important, I don't have to depend on Google or Amazon for a service that might get canned tomorrow.

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